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Case 1

Antral Pseudocyst

A 52-year-old male presents to the dental clinic for an admitting visit. Radiographic examination revealed a dome shaped radiopacity in the right sinus. What is the most likely diagnosis?

 

INCORRECT.

True sinus mucocele is an accumulation of mucin that is completely encased by epithelial lining. It can occur by trauma (such as sinus surgery) or it can arise from an obstruction of the sinus ostium, thereby blocking normal drainage.

 

 

INCORRECT.

Periapical cysts and granuloma cannot be differentiated by radiographic examination alone. Both lesions are related to non-vital tooth and radiographically appear radiolucent with absence of lamina dura at the apical area.

 

 

INCORRECT.

Periapical cysts and granuloma cannot be differentiated by radiographic examination alone. Both lesions are related to non-vital tooth and radiographically appear radiolucent with absence of lamina dura at the apical area.

 

 

CORRECT.

Antral Pseudocyst is a retention pseudocyst, where the process consists of inflammatory exudate primarily serum. It accumulates under the maxillary sinus mucosa and causes a dome shaped elevation. It is asymptomatic and the patient is usually unaware of the lesion. The lesion does not require treatment because they can resolve spontaneously without any residual effect on antral mucosa.

 

 

INCORRECT.

Odontogenic cysts, such as keratocystic odontogenic tumors, displace the floor of the antrum and the border of the cyst becomes coincident with the bony sinus floor.

 


Case 1 References

Neville B, Damm DD, Allen CM, Bouquot J. Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, 3rd Edition, W.B. Saunders Co.; 2009

White SC, Pharoah MJ. Oral Radiology: Principles and Interpretation, 6th Edition, Mosby; 2009

 

Case 2

A 77-year-old female presented to the dental clinic for a routine visit. Upon radiographic examination, a linear radiopacity near the spinal column was noted. During extra-oral examination, patient was asymptomatic. What is the most likely diagnosis?

 

INCORRECT.

 

 

CORRECT.

The styloid process is a long cartilaginous bone located on the temporal bone. The muscles and ligaments which have a role in mastication and swallowing are attached to the styloid process. Ossification of stylohyoid ligament can be detected on panoramic radiographs as linear radiopacity extending from posteroinferior aspect of the ramus toward the hyoid bone. Symptoms, such as neck and cervicofacial pain, related to elongated stylohyoid process or ossification of stylohyoid ligament is called Eagle Syndrome. For asymptomatic individuals, no treatment is required. For symptomatic patients, recommended treatment can include steroid or lidocaine injections into tonsillar fossa or amputation of stylohyoid process.

 

 

INCORRECT.

 

 

INCORRECT.

Arterial calcifications can be seen in facial artery and are less commonly in the carotid artery. Calcified vessels appear as a parallel pair of thin, radiopaque lines that follow the anatomy of the artery (straight or tortuous).

 

 

INCORRECT.

Sialolith involving the parotid gland appears as a round to cylindrical in shape radiopacity and will superimpose on the body of the ramus radiographically.

 


Case 2 References

White SC, Pharoah MJ. Oral Radiology: Principles and Interpretation, 6th Edition, Mosby; 2009

 

Case 3

A 13-year-old female presents to the dental clinic for routine care. Upon radiographic examination, a teardrop-shaped, well-defined radiolucency is noted between the right mandibular lateral incisor and canine, causing displacement of teeth. Both teeth were vital. What is the most likely diagnosis?

 

INCORRECT.

Dentigerous cysts are related exclusively to impacted teeth in coronal position.

 

 

INCORRECT.

Lateral radicular cysts appear to be laterally positioned to the tooth mimicking lateral periodontal cysts, however, the associated tooth will be non-vital.

 

 

CORRECT.

Lateral periodontal cyst is thought to arise from epithelial rests entrapped in the lateral periodontium of the tooth. The lesion is asymptomatic and found mostly in the region extending from the lateral incisor to second premolar. It appears as a well-defined radiolucency with prominent cortical boundary and round or oval shape. The radiographic differential diagnosis of such lesions includes keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KOT) or radicular cyst (related to non-vital tooth) at foramen of lateral or accessory pulp canal. The treatment includes excisional biopsy or simple enucleation. There is no recurrence.

 

 

INCORRECT.

Gingival cyst of adult is the soft tissue counterpart of a lateral periodontal cyst. It usually does not demonstrate any bony involvement.

 

 

INCORRECT.

Radicular (periapical) cyst is associated to the root of non-vital tooth.

 


Case 3 References

White SC, Pharoah MJ. Oral Radiology: Principles and Interpretation, 6th Edition, Mosby; 2009



Case 4

A patient presents to the dental clinic with a white, papillary, exophytic lesion on the right anterior portion of the tongue. What is the most likely clinical diagnosis?

 

CORRECT.

Squamous papilloma is a benign proliferation of stratified squamous epithelium which has papillary presentation. The lesion appears as a soft, painless, exophytic lesion with numerous finger-like projections that can be pointed or blunted (“cauliflower” or wartlike appearance). The lesion is induced by human papilloma virus (low risk HPV 6 and 11 seen in 50% of oral papillomas). The viruses in oral squamous papilloma have extremely low virulence and infectivity rate.

 

 

INCORRECT.

Fibroma is the most common reactive lesion of the oral cavity caused because of irritation or trauma. It appears as a smooth-surfaced nodule (sessile or pedunculated) that is similar in color to the surrounding mucosa.

 

 

INCORRECT.

Condyloma acuminatum, also known as venereal wart, is a virus-induced prolifera­tion of squamous epithelium of the genitalia, perianal region, mouth, and larynx. Condyloma is considered to be a sexually transmitted disease (STD), with lesions devel­oping at a site of sexual contact or trauma. The typical condyloma appears as a sessile, pink, well-demarcated, nontender exophytic mass with short, blunted surface projections. The condyloma tends to be larger than the papilloma and is characteristically clustered with other condylomata.

 

 

INCORRECT.

Verruca vulgaris, also known as a wart, is a benign, virus-induced, focal epithelial hyperplasia. It is contagious and can spread to other parts of a person’s skin or mucous membranes by way of autoinoculation. It infrequently develops on oral mucosa but is extremely common on the skin. Clinically, it appears as painless, exophytic, papillary lesion that is white in color.

 

 

INCORRECT.

Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a virus-induced, localized proliferation of oral squamous epithelium. This disease typically appears as multiple soft, nontender, flattened or rounded papules, which are usually clustered and the color of normal mucosa, although they may be scattered, pale, or rarely white. Occasional lesions show a slight papillary surface change.

 


Case 4 References

Neville B, Damm DD, Allen CM, Bouquot J. Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, 3rd Edition, W.B. Saunders Co.; 2009